CompNtwk : Lab 6.2.5 Creating an Address Allocation Spreadsheet

Step 1: Record the network address block

In the first column, record the address block used for the entire FilmCompany network chosen in the previous lab.

Step 2: Define the 254-host networks

Based on the requirements for the FilmCompany network, the address block is divided into twelve separate networks using four different masks.

In the second column of the table above, record the network blocks that will support 254 hosts per

network. In the last column, record the names of the networks that need to be assigned to these blocks.

The CIDR notation mask for the 254-host network is /24. What is the dotted decimal equivalent mask?

255.255.255.0

Step 3: Define the 126-host networks

In the third column of the table above, choose the first unused 254 host address block to subdivide

into 126-host networks. In the last column, record the names of the networks assigned to these 126-host blocks.

The CIDR notation mask for the 126-host network is /25. What is the dotted decimal equivalent mask?

255.255.255.128

Step 4: Define the 62-host networks

In the fourth column of the table above, choose the first unused 126-host address block to subdivide

into 62-host networks.

In the last column, record the names of the networks assigned to these 62-host blocks.

The CIDR notation mask for the 62-host network is /26. What is the dotted decimal equivalent mask?

255.255.255.192

Step 5: Define the 14-host networks

In the fifth column of the table above, choose the first unused 62-host address block to subdivide into

14-host networks. In the last column, record the names of the networks assigned to these 14-host blocks.

The CIDR notation mask for the 14-host network is /28. What is the dotted decimal equivalent mask?

255.255.255.240

Task 2: Define the Host Address Assignments

For each network, determine and document the host addresses and broadcast addresses. Use the table

below to document these networks and host information.

Step 1: Record the network names and addresses in the addressing table

In the table below, record the network names for the FilmCompany in the first column and the corresponding network address in the second column.

Step 2: Calculate the lowest host address in the addressing table

The lowest address for a network is one greater than the address of the network. Therefore, to calculate the lowest host address, add a 1 to the network address. For each of these networks, calculate and record the lowest host address in the second column of the table.

Step 3: Calculate the broadcast address in the addressing table

The broadcast address uses the highest address in the network range. This is the address in which the bits in the host portion are all 1s. To calculate the broadcast for each of the networks listed, convert the last octet of the network address into binary. Then fill the remaining host bits with 1s. Finally, convert the binary back to decimal. For each of these networks, calculate and record the broadcast address in the last column.

Step 4: Calculate the highest host address in the addressing table

The highest address for each address is the network address is one less than the broadcast address for that network. Therefore, to calculate the highest host address, subtract a 1 from the broadcast address. For each of these networks, calculate and record the highest host address in the second column.

Network Names Network Address Lowest HostAddress Highest HostAddress Broadcast Address
voice 192.168.0.0 /24 192.168.0.1 192.168.1.254 192.168.1.255
support 192.168.1.0 /25 192.168.1.1 192.168.1.126 192.168.1.127
production 192.168.1.128 /25 192.168.1.129 192.168.1.254 192.168.1.255
future 192.168.2.0 /25 192.168.2.1 192.168.2.126 192.168.2.127
null 192.168.2.128 /25 192.168.2.129 192.168.2.254 192.168.2.255
administrative 192.168.3.0 /26 192.168.3.1 192.168.3.62 192.168.3.63
mobile 192.168.3.64 /26 192.168.3.65 192.168.3.126 192.168.3.127
peripherals 192.168.3.128 /26 192.168.3.129 192.168.3.190 192.168.3.191
Web_access 192.168.3.192 /28 192.168.3.193 192.168.3.206 192.168.3.207
default 192.168.3.208 /28 192.168.3.209 192.168.3.222 192.168.3.223
management 192.168.3.224 /28 192.168.3.225 192.168.3.238 192.168.3.239
net_admin 192.168.3.240 /28 192.168.3.241 192.168.3.254 192.168.3.255

Task 3: Examine Address Blocks for Overlapping Addresses

One of the major issues of planning network addresses is overlapping addresses. This is especially true when using VLSM addressing. Examine the table in the previous step to ensure that each network has a unique address range.

Are there any overlapping addresses in the networks?Tidak

If there are any overlapping addresses, recalculate the addressing plan for the FilmCompany network.

Lab 6.2.6 Diagramming the Network

Step 1: Identify the appropriate VLAN

In the previous labs, you identified VLANs and subnets to be used in the FilmCompany network expansion. For each device listed in the table in the final section of this lab, assign each host the appropriate VLAN based on its description. Record these VLAN assignments in the third column of the table in Step 5.

Step 2: Assign addresses to the devices

In the previous lab, an address range was established for each subnet and VLAN. Using these established ranges and the VLAN assignments to the devices in the previous step, assign a host address to each of the selected hosts. Record this information in the last column of the table in Step 5 of this lab.

Step 3: Define the codes for device naming

From the device information, develop and apply a naming convention for the hosts.

A good naming scheme follows these guidelines:

  • • Keep the names as short as possible; using fewer than twelve characters is recommended.
  • • Indicate the device type, purpose, and location with codes, rather than words or abbreviations.
  • • Maintain a consistent scheme. Consistent naming makes it easier to sort and report on the devices,

and to set up management systems.

  • • Document the names in the IT department files and on the network topology diagrams.
  • • Avoid names that make it easy to find protected resources.

For each naming criteria, assign a code for type. You will use these codes in different combinations to create device names. In the tables below, create codes for the elements of the device names. Use as many or as few codes as needed.

Device Type Type code Device Purpose Purpose code Device Location Location code
Laptop LT Management MGMT Stadium STAD
Desktop PC PC Production PROD 1st Floor 1FLR
Workstation WS Netadmin NETA 3rd Floor 3FLR
Printer PT ServerRoom SVRM
Scanner SC
Server SV

Step 4: Establish the naming convention

In the spaces below, indicate the order and the number of letters to be used in the device naming. Again, use as many or as few letters as necessary. List the criteria in the blanks and draw a line to indicate the number of letters used. You may also choose to use hyphens (-) or underscores (_) to separate fields.

Step 5: Apply a naming convention

For each of the twelve devices shown in this table, apply the naming convention. Then add these device

names in the appropriate boxes in the topology at the beginning of the lab.

Number Device Name VLAN Description IP Address
1 servers Server for capturing raw video feeds from stadium
2 servers Server for storing finished (postproduction) video
3 web_access Public web server for on demand video access
4 management Branch manager’s computer
5 production Live event production worker (switched)
6 support Human resource clerk
7 support Payroll Manager
8 mobile Live event mobile worker (audio producer)
9 mobile Live event mobile worker (camera coordinator)
10 support Receptionist’s computer
11 management Financial Manager’s computer
12 net_admin Information Technology manager’s computer

 

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